Tuesday, April 22, 2014
arandomsample:

Think I might try this next month.

The stress!

arandomsample:

Think I might try this next month.

The stress!

(Source: outspokenyaya)

arandomsample:

And/or maybe this one…

Should I do this or not??

arandomsample:

And/or maybe this one…

Should I do this or not??

(Source: books-cupcakes)

Could this be Tootie’s house from Saving Cee Cee Honeycutt? 

Could this be Tootie’s house from Saving Cee Cee Honeycutt? 

I love the colors in this photo.

I love the colors in this photo.

(Source: mymrharrywales)

Sunday, April 20, 2014
georgianadesign:

Wells & Fox Architectural Interiors, Chicago.

georgianadesign:

Wells & Fox Architectural Interiors, Chicago.

keytotherosegarden:

septemberwildflowers:

For I am His, and He is mine.

One of my favorite songs.

keytotherosegarden:

septemberwildflowers:

For I am His, and He is mine.

One of my favorite songs.

Saturday, April 19, 2014
How quick come the reasons for approving what we like! Jane Austen, Persuasion. (via betweenthosefinelines)
kitchenzz:

kitchen by Christine Kelly / Crafted Architecture http://www.houzz.com/photos/404251/Alexandria-Residence-traditional-kitchen-dc-metro  #4

I’ve always wanted a window seat in my kitchen.  Maybe…..

kitchenzz:

kitchen by Christine Kelly / Crafted Architecture http://www.houzz.com/photos/404251/Alexandria-Residence-traditional-kitchen-dc-metro
#4

I’ve always wanted a window seat in my kitchen.  Maybe…..

minutemanworld:

James Warren (not to be confused with Joseph Warren) was another leader in the Patriot movement. On April 6, 1775 he was meeting with other members of the first Provincial Congress in Concord and wrote a letter to his wife, Mercy Otis Warren:

“This town is full of cannon, ammunition, stores, etc., and the [British] Army long for them and they want nothing but strength to induce an attempt on them. The people are ready and determine to defend this country inch by inch”

We know that “the people” did defend the country “inch by inch”, but how full was the town of munitions?
Ten tons of musket balls and cartridges
Thirty-five half barrels of powder
350 tents
Fourteen medicine chests
Eighty barrels of beef
Eight and a half tons of salt fish
Seventeen and a half tons of rye
318 barrels of flour
100 barrels of salt
Twenty bushels of oatmeal
Nineteen sets of harness
Hundreds of spades, axes, canteens, wooden spoons and dishes
Candles, matches, butter, reams of cartridge paper, and other stores
Substantial number of cannon and gun carriages of varying sizes. (various books have put the total at between 30 and 60 cannon of various sizes)
Concord was one of the major supply depots for the Massachusetts Provincial Congress and the army of 14,000 militia it was hoping to build. The town of Worcester had even more supplies than Concord. It was briefly considered as a target for a raid, but was crossed off the list because it was 40 miles from Boston through even worse terrain, and through a population that was among the most radical in Massachusetts.
John R. Galvin. The Minute Men: The First Fight: Myths and Realities of the American Revolution
 
 

minutemanworld:

James Warren (not to be confused with Joseph Warren) was another leader in the Patriot movement. On April 6, 1775 he was meeting with other members of the first Provincial Congress in Concord and wrote a letter to his wife, Mercy Otis Warren:

“This town is full of cannon, ammunition, stores, etc., and the [British] Army long for them and they want nothing but strength to induce an attempt on them. The people are ready and determine to defend this country inch by inch”

We know that “the people” did defend the country “inch by inch”, but how full was the town of munitions?

  • Ten tons of musket balls and cartridges
  • Thirty-five half barrels of powder
  • 350 tents
  • Fourteen medicine chests
  • Eighty barrels of beef
  • Eight and a half tons of salt fish
  • Seventeen and a half tons of rye
  • 318 barrels of flour
  • 100 barrels of salt
  • Twenty bushels of oatmeal
  • Nineteen sets of harness
  • Hundreds of spades, axes, canteens, wooden spoons and dishes
  • Candles, matches, butter, reams of cartridge paper, and other stores
  • Substantial number of cannon and gun carriages of varying sizes. (various books have put the total at between 30 and 60 cannon of various sizes)

Concord was one of the major supply depots for the Massachusetts Provincial Congress and the army of 14,000 militia it was hoping to build. The town of Worcester had even more supplies than Concord. It was briefly considered as a target for a raid, but was crossed off the list because it was 40 miles from Boston through even worse terrain, and through a population that was among the most radical in Massachusetts.

John R. Galvin. The Minute Men: The First Fight: Myths and Realities of the American Revolution

 

 

minutemanworld:

Rebuilt Lexington belfry. Lexington was a bit unusual in that the church did not have a bell tower. Instead it had a stand alone belfry which was cheaper to construct and maintain.
Church bells were an integral part of the alarm systems used in New England. On the night of April 18, 1775 many people remember the constant ringing of the church bells and the firing of the muskets in signal (generally the signal was three rapid shots in a row).
When a town was alerted the captain of the militia would either call for a volunteer to ride to the next town (or someone would volunteer before he could ask). As that person heads off the captain would also fire three shots from his musket and have the church bells rung as a signal to local militia to gather at the pre-appointed spot.
On the night of April 18th, some towns actually started the process of gathering their militia together before the alarm riders reached them because of the gun shots and alarm bells.

minutemanworld:

Rebuilt Lexington belfry. Lexington was a bit unusual in that the church did not have a bell tower. Instead it had a stand alone belfry which was cheaper to construct and maintain.

Church bells were an integral part of the alarm systems used in New England. On the night of April 18, 1775 many people remember the constant ringing of the church bells and the firing of the muskets in signal (generally the signal was three rapid shots in a row).

When a town was alerted the captain of the militia would either call for a volunteer to ride to the next town (or someone would volunteer before he could ask). As that person heads off the captain would also fire three shots from his musket and have the church bells rung as a signal to local militia to gather at the pre-appointed spot.

On the night of April 18th, some towns actually started the process of gathering their militia together before the alarm riders reached them because of the gun shots and alarm bells.